Tag Archives: Get your Home Ready To Sell

Where Are Home Prices Heading Through 2017?

9 Mar

Where Are Home Prices Heading Through 2017?

Daily Real Estate News |      Thursday, March 07, 2013


Home prices are expected to continue their trajectory upward, projected to rise 3.7 percent between the third quarters of 2013 and 2014, according to Fiserv, which used data from the Federal Housing Finance Agency for its projection.

Following the third quarter of 2014, Fiserv predicts home prices to rise an average 3.3 percent annually over the next three years.

“Although some recent real estate activity has been speculative, it seems as if buyers have more realistic expectations about housing market returns after having lived through the largest housing market crash in U.S. history,” says David Stiff, Fiserv’s chief economist. “2012 was the first year since 1997 that the housing market has resembled something recognizable as normal. For the past 15 years, home-price changes and sales volumes have either been boosted by a bubble mentality or crushed by crash psychology.”

In 1997, home prices grew at a 3 percent rate, Stiff says, but from 1998 to 2006, prices started soaring above 5 percent and even saw double-digit increases in some of those years.

By the end of 2013, Fiserv expects that home prices will increase in nearly every U.S. metro area, while some markets may see short-term double-digit price increases.

Source: “Home Prices Expected to Rise at Least 3.3 Percent Annually Through 2017,” RISMedia (March 6, 2013)

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12 Jan

Time to List your Property with The FSBO Store

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Is blue for you? How to choose a paint color for your house

9 Dec

Is blue for you? How to choose a paint color for your house – by Mary Boone

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Different body and trim colors gives this Charleston, S.C., home a more traditional look. – Zillow

What’s the best color to paint your house?

It depends, according to experts who say color choices should be based on factors including the style of your home, landscape, neighborhood, roof color and stonework.

Red may be your all-time favorite color, but if the brick facade on your house has a decidedly pink tint to it, you’d be wise to paint another shade. And, just because all the latest home decor magazines are forecasting blue to be the color of the year in 2013 (and they are), that doesn’t mean it will work on your house.

“Exterior paint choices are less influenced by trends than fashion or even interior paint choices,” said Krim Danzinger, senior consultant for AkzoNobel, maker of Glidden paints.

Good thing. Exterior paint jobs, after all, are the kind of pricey projects that most homeowners hope to undertake just once every decade or so.

“When you’re painting the inside of your home, you have the luxury of being more fearless with color. It’s a way to convey your uniqueness to the people you know well enough to invite into your home,” said Barbara Richardson, director of color marketing for AkzoNobel. “But when we talk about exteriors, we have to look at the community you’re part of. You need to look at the environment and the other houses on your street. There’s a sense of camaraderie you want to have with your neighbors. If your house color clashes with theirs, you distract from the appearance of the whole street.”

Get started
When you’re trying to decide what color to paint your house, Richardson advises studying homes in neighborhoods you admire. Photograph color combinations you love — on houses as well as in clothing, wallpaper or fabrics. Do your research. If you live in a fanciful Victorian or stately craftsman, do you know how these homes have traditionally been painted in your part of the country? Do any of these historic color combinations inspire you?

Then, after you’ve spent time narrowing down your choices, buy a quart of several different paints and try them on your house. How do they look next to your stone chimney? How do they look in morning or at night?

Leatrice Eiseman, head of the Eiseman Center for Color Information and Training and executive director of the Pantone® Color Institute, says you also can’t overlook the neighborhood when choosing exterior paint.

The undertones in your next-door neighbors’ homes should help inform your palette. Are their homes warm (beige, rose, brown, gold, yellow) or cool (gray, blue, green, teal)? You’ll want to choose colors that work in harmony with the other houses on your block.

Match location and architecture
“San Francisco is filled with ‘Painted Ladies,’ Victorian houses that are painted bold combinations like purple, mulberry and mauve. It’s bright and unusual, and it totally fits,” Richardson said. “A similarly styled house in a more conservative area, let’s say Dubuque, Iowa, might be painted off-white or very pale yellow. That would be a good fit for that region.

“In the Bahamas, you might see dozens of blue houses with bright yellow or green shutters,” she continued. “On the other hand, there might only be a handful of blue houses in all of Tempe, Ariz. Blue just isn’t a big color there.”

So, what should you do if the color you love doesn’t mesh with your architecture or region?

“Think small doses,” suggests Jackie Jordan, director of color marketing for Sherwin-Williams. “Pops of color can be added to your exterior in much the same way you use pillows or wall-hangings to add color to your interior.

“If you painted your entire house bright red, it would probably stick out like a sore thumb,” she said. “But by painting your door red, you’re able to show your personality without having everyone in the neighborhood wonder, ‘Oh, my God, what was she thinking?’ ”

Is there a color you should never paint your house?

“Never say never,” Eiseman said. “I might not paint a house black, but black trim could work beautifully. It’s all about what colors you’re mixing it with and how much you’re using.”

Find inspiration
Looking for more exterior paint inspiration? Consider these tips from the color experts at AkzoNobel:

  • Want a contemporary appearance? Consider painting the body and trim of your home all the same color. This is also a great way to let the light reveal architectural detail through natural shading.
  • For a more traditional look, incorporate two, three or four colors into your scheme. Highlighting trim will often help create a historical feeling, especially if the colors you’ve chosen are representative of a particular historical palette.
  • Hide your undesirables — gutters, electrical conduits, vents and utility boxes — by painting them the same color as the body of your home.
  • Don’t forget your landscaping. Flowers and shrubs can greatly enhance the color of your home. For instance, you can bring out the soft yellow of your trim color with the flowers near your entry or plant a variety of purple shades to add interest to a neutral scheme.

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How to Limit Spending When Getting A Home Ready To Sell

30 Jun

A home inspector is another asset Sellers should take advantage of to save money. Buyers will likely hire their own inspector to examine a home, and if they find significant problems, they may ask sellers to lower their asking price or walk away altogether. However, sellers who discover issues beforehand and have them repaired may be in a better position to price their homes and mitigate potential problems.

Keep improvements to a minimum

Minor updates to a home can be helpful in attracting buyers. However, going overboard on updates to sell a home may not give sellers the kind of return they are expecting. For example, adding on an office addition or turning the basement into a den may make a home more appealing, but buyers may be unlikely to pay a great deal extra for it, according to the National Association of Realtors. Instead, sellers may benefit more from small touch-ups, such as repainting the home, adding new fixtures and hiring a landscaper to improve a property’s curb appeal.

Not sure where to start with your exterior? Realtor.com posted great suggestions that included:
• Keep the lawn edged, cut and watered regularly.
• Trim hedges, weed lawns and flowerbeds, and prune trees regularly.
•Check the foundation, steps, walkways, walls and patios for cracks and crumbling.
• Inspect doors and windows for peeling paint.
•Clean and align gutters.
• Inspect and clean the chimney.
•Repair and replace loose or damaged roof shingles.
•Repair and repaint loose siding and caulking.
• In Northern winters, keep walks neatly cleared of snow and ice.
•During spring and summer months consider adding a few showy annuals, perhaps in pots, near your front entrance.
• Re-seal an asphalt driveway.
•Keep your garage door closed.
•Store RVs or (extra) cars elsewhere while the house is on the market.
•Apply a fresh coat of paint to the front door.

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